March 9th, Amateur Boxing in Detroit Lakes, MN

Sam Lavoy (White Earth Nation) is defeated by Joey Grove (Lakes Area Boxing) by decision after 3 rounds.  (90 pounds)

Round 1

Lavoy comes out throwing from the start, windmilling into his opponent.  Grove is no shrinking violet, and he’s lashing out here and there as the opportunity presents itself.  There isn’t much science in the early going, but Lavoy does slow down after a bit, and eventually finds a home for a good straight right, which he lands repeatedly.

Round 2

Lavoy rushes in again, but his offensive is shorter-lived.  Grove responds with a couple of effective one-twos.  Lavoy is discovering his jab, and he is scoring well with it.  In the last fifteen seconds of the round Grove starts coming forward, landing a nice extended flurry of power punches that lasts until the bell.

Round 3

Lavoy’s pattern is to come out aggressive, and he does so again, but it’s hard to say how effectively.  It seems that much of his aggression is going into the wind.  Grove is now landing a big left jab.  Lavoy has no defense for it.  Grove is dominating this round – at one point I counted no fewer than eight consecutive jabs, landing to Lavoy’s face!  Lavoy is on his heels and breathing heavily as Grove continues to come forward, and the bell rings.

Matt Umland (Unattached – Wadena) defeats Ryder Grove (Iron Range Boxing Academy) by decision after three rounds (90#)

Round 1

Umland comes out with tremendous aggression, battering Grove from the opening bell.  Ryder can do little but keep moving, hoping Umland will punch himself out.  Midway through the round referee Tyler Hultin pauses the action to warn Umland for an illegal punch.  Near the end of the round Grove does connect wtih a good one-two, but this round goes to Umland by a dominant performance.

Round 2

Umland seems a bit winded in the second, but continues to outperform Grove.  He’s an aggressive and hard-nosed kid.  Grove lands a couple of shots in the middle going that put Umland off balance but doesn’t capitalize.  Umland finishes the round with more measured aggression, but Grove scored a bit more in the second than the first.

Round 3

Umland isn’t punching with the same snap that he did in the first two.  Grove is getting a lot of advice from the crowd, because everyone can see that Umland is tiring.  Grove is trading on more or less even terms with Umland now, but he doesn’t seem to see his opportunity.

Wayne Lavoy (White Earth Nation) is defeated by Jerimiah Asmund (Wadena – Stomp Boxing) by referee stoppage in the first round (128#)

Round 1

Asmund comes right out and asserted himself in the first fifteen seconds, landing several hard shts that hurt Lavoy.  Referee Hultin gives Lavoy a standing eight count almost immediately.  Action resumes and Hultin warns Asmund – I think for holding and hitting.  Action resumes again and Asmund jukes left, then right, then walks right in and pummels Lavoy.  This one is over – referee stoppage.

Isaac Nokes (White Earth Nation) is defeated by Chazzy Roper (sp?) (Leech Lake) by referee stoppage in the second round, 138#

Round 1

Roper seems to be a late substitution, but he shows he belongs right away, trading with Nokes in an early slugfest.  Roper is going to the body, and connecting with the taller Nokes with some hurtful shots.  Nokes groans loudly during an exchange in the middle of the ring, but rather than an eight count, the referee pauses the action and gives Roper a warning for low blows.  I didn’t see anything low, but I saw Nokes get hurt to the body.  Nokes spends some time in the corner and comes out refreshed, going toe-to-toe with Roper.  Roper is going body-head, body-head with some success.  Nokes comes forward and lands a very big right hand to roper’s head, but Roper shakes it off and comes forward again.  There’s more trading, and Roper is letting more of those shots through.  More trading as the round ends.

Round 2

The second ends as the first ended, with lanky Nokes and stocky Roper trading power shots.  Roper is a bulldog!  Nokes stumbles and puts his hand down on the mat, but it isn’t being counted as a knockdown.  Action resumes with Ropes backing Nokes into a corner, landing one particularly harsh right hand in the process.  In the corner Roper pounds Nokes until the referee must administer another eight count.  This time, looking closely into Nokes’ eyes, the referee doesn’t like what he sees and waves the fight off.  Win for Roper!

Andretti Bushey (Leech Lake) is defeated by Seth Gerving (Lakes Area Boxing) by decision after three rounds (138#)

This was a late addition to the card, not in the program.  At the outset I didn’t even know which fighter was which, so there’ll only be a summary.  Bushey has poor footwork, fought off his back foot, had his knees locked much of the fight, held his hands low, and didn’t show much offense until the final round.  But near the end of the third round he did land a big shot to Gerving’s head which resulted in a standing eight count.

Levi Holmquist (Fergus Falls Boxing Club) is defeated by Josh Polluck (Unattached – Minneapolis) by decision after three rounds (190#)

Round 1

Holmquist comes out looking to fight scientifically, but Polluck, a big hitter, has come to rumble.  Polluck has his hands full with an unorthodox fighter showing tremendous aggression.  What we have here is two two guys whaling on each other.  About hafway through the round we get our first conventional one-two combination from Holmquist.  Both men are wearing out and wearing down as the round progresses, but Polluck scores a couple of times with nice shots in the late going.

Round 2

Holmquist goes to the body early, coming in low and throwing hooks.  Polluck continues to be rough and unorthodox, holding and flailing.  Polluck’s legs seem to be fading midway through the second, but he does land a big overhand right.  Holmquist comes forward, but another overhand lands.  Polluck is starting to come through Holmquist’s defense.  Another big right staggers Holmquist and he nearly goes to a knee.  Referee Gilbert Hernandez gives Holmquist a standing eight, which seems to be just what Holmquist needs.  The remainder of the round is pretty tame.

Round 3

Polluck knows he’s found a home for his looping right, and he’s determined to throw it a ton.  Holmquist turns the tables on him, landing a big combination that leaves Polluck looking out the earhole of his headgear  The fight is paused briefly while his headgear is adjusted.  Upon resumption of the fight Holmquist looks much stronger, battering Polluck with power shots.  Polluck is exhausted now, just swinging his arms.  Holmquist is stalking, landing single left jabs and right hands.  As the bell rings, Polluck’s legs are gone.  If this was a fight, Holmquist won it.  But it’s a boxing match, so we’ll have to see what the scorecards say…

Sam Anderson (Fergus Falls Boxing Club) is defeated by Jamaal Bradley (Red River Golden Gloves) by decision after three rounds (190#)

Round 1

Bradley, taller by a few inches, comes out with some fast left jabs.  But the fighters spend some time circling before Anderson finally turns on the juice.  Anderson mounts a sustaind assault that pins Bradlety on the ropes, and continues to throw punches, most of them blocked, until the referee administers a standing eight count.    After the break there’s more of the same, with Anderson  again trapping Bradley against the ropes, but this time Bradley shoves him away and shows some offense.  Somewhere along the way Bradley has popped Anderson’s nose, which is bleeding profusely.  It was probably one of those fast jabs – sometimes Bradley is too fast for his own good.  Anderson is an aggressive bull, coming forward to the end.

Round 2

Anderson knows what he has to do, and he comes forward with great agression, knocking Bradley down with a big flurry.  Bradley is prepared for Anderson’s next rush, and tags Anderson back, sending a huge spray of blood onto the first row, with most of it landing on yours truly!  There’s a standing eight count for the dazed Anderson.  Anderson next catches Bradley with an illegal low blow, which leaves Bradley shouting and groaning in agony.  A break ensues, but afterwards fireworks erupt!  Anderson comes forward with tremendous aggression, and Bradley might as well be countering with a hammer!  Both men are windmilling at each other, and both are landing huge shots.  Bell and round – the crowd is screaming!

Round 3

Anderson has shown himself to be very, very tough.  He’s taken many of Bradley’s best shots without blinking.  But about thirty seconds into the third round Bradley stuns Anderson and then lands about ten straight shots.  It’s a bloodbath out there, and a little bit over here, too.  There’s another eight count for Anderson.  Bradley has timed Anderson, and he’s countering with huge right hooks when Anderson tries to get inside.  Anderson is getting tentative.  He knows every time he comes forward he’s going to be punished.  In the end, Anderson can no longer get inside, and his entire face is covered in blood, as is my shirt.

Ron Engrum (Golden Lakes Boxing) -vs- Colton Warner (Unattached – Minneapolis)  THIS FIGHT HAS BEEN CANCELED.

Intermission

Denver Peterson (Red River Golden Gloves) defeats Chace Metelak (Lakes Area Boxing) by decision after three rounds (132#)

Round 1

Peterson comes out aggressive, jabbing furiously and making Metelak run.  With the stage set, Peterson slows down his pursuit and the two settle into a more conventional style of combat.  Both fighters are very fast and athletic, but Metelak, much taller, lands the first hard shot of the fight.  Metalak lands a couple more power shots.   Seeing the difficulty of his proposition, Peterson puts his head down and bulls forward, landing some effective body shots just before the bell.

Round 2

Peterson is looking more tenative, trying to jab his more lengthy opponent from the outside.  Metelak is sharpshooting now, and Peterson ties him up.  Metelak comes forward with evil intent but Peterson counters him and lands a right hook to the body.  Now there’s an exchange in which both men want to stand their ground, which make for good action.  Metelak lands the hardest shot of the round near the end, a right hand that jolts Peterson’s head back.  Bell.

Round 3

Peterson lands a big left that dazes Metelak and then capitalizes by coming forward and absolutely hammering his opponent with a bevy of power shots.  Metelak literallyy turned his back and ran away from that flurry.  Both fighters are winded now, and though many punches are being thrown, not many are landing.  Peterson keeps putting his head down and punching blindly as he comes forward.  His coach and the referee both admonish him for that, and finally he keeps his head up and lands a hard right hand to punctuate the third round and the bout.

Seth Carpenter (Fergus Falls Boxing Club) is defeated by Matt Mason (Lakes Area Boxing) by decision after three rounds (160#)

Round 1

Carpenter is a long, lanky fighter and he starts the bout with a lot of jabs, but Mason lands a hard right hand to his ribcage, drawing a big reaction from the crowd.   Our combatants spend some time circling, then Mason goes on the attack and walks forward, winging shots from both hands.  Mason seems to be getting the upper hand when carpenter suddenly lands a big jab that freezes his advance.  The rest of the round is more tactical, with Mason trying to attack and Carpenter playing defense.  Near the end of the round Carpenter sees an opening and tries to land a big shot, but misses and eats a hard counter.

Round 2

Mason is the aggressor in the second round, comstantly coming forward and landing the bigger shots.  Carpenter tries to counter while moving bvackward, but it takes him half of the round before he lands a good shot.  It’s a very good shot though, snapping Mason’s head back.  Yet Mason keeps coming forward, and he’s clearly the bigger hitter, and the more hard-nosed fighter.  Carpenter has pretty good footwork for a tall guy, and near the end of the round he seems to be trying to hold his ground.  This stymies Mason’s advance and gives us a better exchange near the end of the second.

Round 3

Carpenter is showing more offense as the third commences.  Carpenter tries to land a big one-two, but both punches are blocked, then Mason comes rushing forward, throwing wildly.  Carpenter lands a jab that staggers Mason!  After an eight count the fight resumes with Mason taking a more careful approach.  The fight is becoming more strategic.  Then Carpenter lands a hard single shot that seems to wake Mason, and Mason goes on the attack again.  Mason backs Carpenter into the ropes and gives him everything – Carpenter lasts until the final bell, and I don’t think this one will be too hard to score.

Clayton Bruchowski (Eastman) defeats Albert Bolt (Wadena Golden Gloves) by decision after three rounds (135#)

Round 1

Bruchowski comes out throwing but doesn’t land anything in the early seconds of the round.  Bolt, much shorter than his opponent, has to look for a spot to attack, and finally lands a good shot.  Bruchowski has a very fast jab and a very vocal coach, and he is taking advantage of both.  Bolt is a well put together young man, and he seems to be a bigger hitter, but he’s having hard time getting close enough to land anything.  Bolt tries to duck under Bruchowski’s guard, but Bruchowski is able to counter most of his attacks effectively.  Near the end of the round Bolt lands a short right hook to Bruchowski’s body, and the smile on Bruchowski’s face proves that he felt it.

Round 2

Bruchowski crosses the ring eagerly at the start of the second.  Bolt is trying to be faster, and comes forward to land a single power shot.  Now there’s an exchange in the center of the ring and both men land well.  Bruchowski’s coach is shouting that Bolt it hurt; he must have seen something I didn’t.  Bolt has decided to come inside and take Bruchowski’s power shots in order to land.  Bolt gets mixed results, as bruchowski shows a good ability to potshot him.  Bolt finally gets inside and lands a viciuos shot to Bruchowski’s body.  Bolt stays inside for a change, and lands several more good body shots before Bruchowski regains his bearings and counters his attack.  The bell rings with both men missing on power shots and getting tangled.

Round 3

Bolt is tring again to get inside.  Bruchowski is continuing to counter effectively, landing beautiful short right hooks on Bolt.  Bolt is circling rapidly, looking for an opening.  Bruchowski is beginning to come forward.  Bolt is a tough kid, but the height disadvantage is probably too much for him to overcome.  Bruchowski lands one big right to Bolt’s head.  Bruchowski again lands cleanly, a combination this time.  This round ends with Bolt again misfiring on an attack.

Killer Jackson (Unattached – Anoka) defeats Luke Wiebolt (Lakes Area Boxing) by decision after three rounds (135#)

Round 1

Wiebolt walks right up to Jackson at the start, and Jackson shows he is an adept counterpuncher.  Wiebolt is aggressive, and he is landing some shots, but Jackson has good fast hands, and he takes a shot well.  Wiebolt is not a graceful fighter, but he does come forward.  Wiebolt has a bit of a tendency to lean forward and throw punches with all of his weight on his front foot, so Jackson is able to walk through most of his punches.  A small percentage of a large quantity of punches are landed in the first round, with Jackson having a decided advantage.

Round 2

Wiebolt comes forward again to start the second.  Wiebolt lands a good right to the body of Jackson, but Jackson comes back with a one-two the puts Wiebolt off balance.  Wiebolt’s response is to increase his aggression, you have to like a fighter like that.  Wiebolt contines to press the attack, but he is slowing down as jackson stands his ground and counters him effectively.  Wiebolt is bleeding from the nose.  jackson lands four big single right hooks in a row.  Wiebolt’s balance is suffering.  Jackson is keeping Wiebolt at a distance with jabs and hammering the body.  Wiebolt continues to attack as the round ends.

Round 3

Between rounds Wiebolt’s corner asks him how he feels, and he replies quite audibly “I’m so tired.”  Wiebolt comes forward at the start of the third, throwing punches as he walks forwarsrd.  Jackson is very good at setting his feet and throwing body shots.  Wiebolt trades with him, but jackson is hurting him with right hand after right hand.  Especially to the body.  Wiebolt tries to attack once again, but Jackson throws a big right hand that glances off wiebolt’s head and staggers him.  There’s a standing eight count.  Coming back from the break Wiebolt attacks again, this time landing some good shots to Jackson’s head and body.  Jackson, bless his soul, is very tough and doesn’t flinch or react.  The bell rings with both fighters winging punches.

Joey Suda (Red River Golden Gloves) defeats Cory Sylvester (Eastman) by decision after three rounds (180#)

Round 1

This is a study in opposites.  Sylvester is a short, heavy kid.  Suda is probably the tallest fighter in the building, and slim.  Sylvester is cirling Suda.  In the early going Suda is potshotting his shorter, slower opponent.  Sylvester takes a particularly sharp shot tothe head and comes up blinking.  Sylvester’s coach is shouting at him to come forward.  Suda attacks and Sylvester counters with a big right hand that will score well.  the rest of the round consists of pawing jabs and off target power shots from both men.

Round 2

Between rounds Sylvester received instructions not to back up.

Suda comes out looking for blood, and lands several hard shot.  Suda comes forward again and this time Sylvester lands a very hard jab that forced him to back off.  The figers are circling to their left.  Suda throws a combination that includes a hard right to the midsection of his pudgy opponent.  Suda backs Sylvester into a neutral corner and feints twice, then misfires on a flurry, which allows Sylvester to escape.  moving across the ring Suda throws a right that hurts Sylvester.  After an interval with little action Sylvester scores with a tremendous left hand that seems to move Suda about two fight to his left.  Surprisingly, Suda is unfazed and continues to attack.  Sylvester springs two more of those thudding hooks to Suda’s body and head, but Suda shakes it off and continues to attack, scoring nicely in the closing moments of the round.

Round 3

I think Suda is finding that fighting Sylvester is like fighting a boulder.  Sylvester is a stronger, tougher fighter than he appears.  Suda is the mobile fighter here, circling Sylvester and pressing a flash attack.  He needs to watch out for those big counters from Sylvester.  Sylvester is not above some roughhouse tactics.  Suda is sharpshooting now, throwing fast and unpredictable combinations that land.  Sylvester’s counters, though effective, are sporadic.  As the fight comes to a close Suda is sticking and moving, Sylvester is trying to find an opening for his bombs.

Amar Kovacevic (Red River Golden Gloves) is defeated by Blake Herron (Unattached – Brainerd) by decision after three rounds (141#)

Round 1

The fight starts slowly, with both men feinting and dodging.  Herron is the first to attack, landing a couple of soft punches to the body of Kovacevic; Kovacevik lands a glancing blow to the head of Herron.  Herron is using speed and movement to force Kovacevik into a tentative attitude, darting in and out and landing one or two punches at a time.  Near the end of the first, Kovacevik attacks but Herron counters well and lands a loud, slapping punch that impresses the crowd.

Round 2

Kovacevik must have gotten good advice between rounds, because he walks right across the ring and plies Herron with a murderous three punch combination to start the round.  Herron is continuing to move around the ring, but Kovacevic is pursuing and bombing him now.  One punch from Kovacevic sends  Herron reeling across the ring, another binds him sideways at the waist.  Herron is still scoring too, but the tide seems to have turned in Kovacevic’s favor by the end of the first.

Round 3

Herron comes forward, sits down, and flurries body shots into Kovacevic’s body at the start of the third.  There’s a furious rally in the middle of the ring, Herron is throwing more punches but Kovacevic has upped his output as well, and his punches definitely have more ustard on them.  Kovacevic has a nice left hand, and it’s landing to Herron’s head with regulatiry.  Herron moves well to his left, and at one point he shimmies to his left, stops suddenly and throws a big one-two that lands.  Kovacevic continues to attack, though with less success than before. The round, the fight, and the evening end with another good rally between Herron and Kovacevic.  Bell!

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9 responses to “March 9th, Amateur Boxing in Detroit Lakes, MN

  1. Thanks for covering this show and the good report. I appreciate you covering the amateurs and getting the kids some press.

  2. Thanks, Terry. I really enjoy doing it – it’s my pleasure. I’m looking forward to meeting you sometime.

  3. Bobby Brunette

    I agree’ great job thank you.

  4. I appreciate how you tell it the way it was and always write from a neutral position. I’ve watched all of last nights fights 3-4 times and your play-by-play story on each fight is GREAT!! Thank you for doing this in a very pleasurable way!! All of the boxers you cover appreciate what you do for us.
    timmyloud
    Lakes Area Boxing, DL

  5. I’m really glad, Tim. Getting it right is very important to me, and I stress out over the details. I appreciate all your kind words, all you guys.

  6. Nice job on the play by play per round!! Keep up the great reporting! As always, Chris Holt hosts a great show!

  7. Nice work on the coverage. Thanks for coming.

  8. Not sure if this will come across as aa dad being a dad bbut I also had over100 amateur fights in my career funny how thacan go out the window when your watching your kid up there. AnywI was wondering if you could take another look at Ryders and tell me if i’m insane. I saw an extremely close fight the ref warned umland for illegal punches plural and he never really stopped throwing them.the white of the glove needs to land on a scoring part of the body or head. And from where I sat there wasnt alot of them I won’t argue the decision but aggression doesn’t equal points. Nor does hardness of punches..take a second look and tell me what you think…even if it’s” hey your nuts”” .. that aside I appreciate what you do for the sport and the fans I will continue to read so write on..

  9. Michael, I don’t know either boy and I have no axe to grind. I call it like I see it from ringside. I appreciate your boy’s participation and I’m sure he’ll rack of plenty of wins in the future. Most importantly, by boxing (in the gym and in competition) he’s learning important things about life, and about himself.

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