Tag Archives: Al Sands

Professional Boxing: August 25th 2017 at Grand Casino Hinckley

Caleb Truax (now 28-3-2 with 18 kayos) defeats KeAndrae Leatherwood (now 20-5-1 with 13 kayos) by TKO at 2:23 of round 10 in a fight scheduled for 10 rounds.

Round 1

Our combatants start the fight with circling.  Leatherwood is inching forward and throwing light jabs that don’t connect.  Now Truax begins coming forward, throwing jabs and little more in the early going.  About a minute in Truax throws a jab followed by a right hand that loops over top, but it’s mostly blocked by Leatherwood.  There’s a clinch, broken up by referee Mark Nelson.  More circling and jabbing.  Round one ends with no significant action.  Was anything learned?  Round 2 will tell.

Round 2

Leatherwood comes out and immediately throws a double jab, followed moments later by a left-right that lands to Truax’s head.  They trade, then clinch, and ref Nelson breaks them up.  Truax lands a hard jab that pushes Leatherwood back.  Leatherwood lunges in, Truax doesn’t give way, and there’s another break.  More circling, more jabbing, Leatherwood tries to duck in but gets caught in another clinch.  Truax comes forward and Leatherwood counters.  Referee Nelson pauses the action to warn Leatherwood – it appeared it was for swinging his elbows.    More tactical movements, then Leatherwood scores a glancing right hand to the head of Truax.  There’s a flurry at the bell, but nothing of importance is landed.

Round 3

Leatherwood opens the round with a jab to the body.  After much  mauling, Truax lands a straight right to the body of Leatherwood.  In the event, Leatherwood’s head clashes with Truax’s and the fighters are both warned.  Almost immediately they go back to a clinch, and try to punch their way out but in the end Leatherwood is warned to keep his punches up.  The pace is picking up as Truax ducks under a hook and it bounces off  the top of his head.  Both men want to get in close, and the result so far has been a close-quarters clash with few clean shots landed.

Round 4

Leatherwood jabs effectively for the first seconds of round 4, but before long we’re back in a clinch and it’s a shoving match.  Truax deftly slips a jab but doesn’t counter.  Leatherwood steps forward and let hooks Truax.  Things are getting rougher.  In a clinch again, Truax is throwing rights to the body.  Truax is bleeding profusely from the left side of his nose, but I didn’t see how it happened.  More clinching, and the bell rings as ref Nelson pulls the tangled fighters apart.

Round 5

Leatherwood jabs crisply to start the round, but again Truax pulls him into a clinch.  Break.  Leatherwood jumps in and throws a big right to the body of Truax.  Ref Nelson warns Leatherwood again, but I don’t know for what.  They’re back in a clinch again.  Neither man can create the distance necessary to land anything significant.  Now they’re shoulder to shoulder and their hands are working more freely.  Leatherwood grunts as he digs an uppercut to the body of Truax.  Still in close, but finally the hands are moving.  Leatherwood is getting the better of it now, throwing hooks to the body and head of Truax.  Truax punctuates the round with a 2 or 3 punch combination at the bell.

Round 6

Leatherwood is trying to throw double and triple jabs.  it doesn’t take long before they’re head to head, shoulder to shoulder again, with Truax throwing multiple uppercuts to the body.  We come to a point where there’s an inch of space between the fighters and they both try to attack, nullifying each other completely.  Mark nelson calls time out and talks to both fighters, but I couldn’t hear what he said.  After the confab we have more mauling and brawling and the round ends without resolution.

Round 7

Both fighters are showing more urgency now, hopefully having been warned that they’ve been very ineffective and inconclusive.  Still, each encounter seems to end with more clutching.  Finally there’s a clinch in which Leatherwood throws two borderline-legal punches to the side-back of Truax, then a punch to the back of the head, and ref Mark Nelson deducts a point from Leatherwood.  Though it continues to be an ugly fight, the activity level of both fighters has been improving.  Still, it would be hard to award this round to either man without the point deduction.

Round 8

An exchange at the start of the round sees Leatherwood lose his mouthpiece.  Once it’s reinserted the fighters resume their wrestling match.  Suddenly Truax lands a big shot, followed by a right that stumbles Leatherwood.  The crowd thinks that Leatherwood is more hurt than he is.  There’s another clinch and Truax gets away with a hard uppercut landed during the break.  More grabbing and dancing, and Leatherwood connects with a hard right, but only one.  There’s more holding, and Nelson warns Leatherwood for holding.  “One more time,” he shouts.  Immediately the fighters go back to head-to-head and maul to the bell.

Round 9

Chest-to-chest to start the round, but again there’s an interlude of action in which both en land good hooks.  Truax puts his head down and pushes Leatherwood into the ropes.  Leatherwood hooks his right arm around Truax’s left and they grapple.  Truax finds the space to land a big right hook that electrifies the crowd, but only for a moment.  Again Truax’s head goes down and it looks like he’s bleeding from his left cheek.  Truax suddenly lands a thunderous right to the head of Leatherwood that gives him the momentum for thirty seconds or so, until Leatherwood lands a glancing right that backs him off.  The crowd sees resolution coming and enthusiastically cheers the end of the ninth.

Round 10

Leatherwood loses his mouthpiece in the early going.  Truax has the momentum now, and he’s throwing everything at Leatherwood, but at times that leaves him vulnerable.  Leatherwood loses his mouthpiece again in a clinch, and though the crowd (and Truax’s corner) are accusing him of spitting it out, I don’t think he did.  Moments later Leatherwood has another point deducted for holding.  Truax is going to town, and Leatherwood is now bleeding – a lot – from the mouth.  Referee Nelson calls time and brings Leatherwood to the doctor, who briefly inspects Leatherwood.  Nelson stops the bout.  It’s over, and Truax is the winner.

Markus Morris (now 11-3 with 7 kayos) defeats Tony Lee (now 11-2-1 with 3 kayos) by TKO at 2:16 in round 3 of a bout scheduled for 8 rounds.

Round 1

Morris opens the action with jabs, but he doesn’t land.  Tony Lee follows suit.  After some inconclusive swinging, Morris catches Lee going backwards and lands a right in the red corner. Early on Lee is bouncing, moving, going backwards.  Morris is following, but nobody is scoring.  Lee connects with a good left, but only one.  Morris follows Lee into the blue corner, tries to catch him, but Lee attempts to spin away.  It’s a messy one so far.  Now Lee lands a big right (?) that momentarily stuns Morris, and though he pursues, Lee is unable to capitalize.  By the time the round ends, Morris looks recovered.

Round 2

Immediately there’s a clinch, but the fighters punch their way out of it.  Lee is working backwards, Morris following him again.  Lee’s corner wants straight punches: “One-two, straight down the middle!”  These two are not powerful punchers, so the fight is likely to go long.  Morris misses a series of punches, Lee misses with a triple jab.  Morris lunges forward and misses his target, nearly falling into the ropes.  Morris comes forward and Lee catches him, freezing him momentarily.  Lee begins to come forward, but Morris zaps him with a right hand that leaves Lee discombobulated for a moment.  Lee pulls himself together, and bell.

Round 3

Both men comes out winging, and though considerable skill is in play, it has an artless look.  Neither man scores for a time, and then Morris catches Lee with a left to the belly that drops him to his knees.  Lee is up quickly and resumes the fight, but Morris has renewed confidence and moments later knocks Lee’s mouthguard out, then pounds him into the ropes with a right.  Referee Gary Miezwa begins the count, but I don’t think he finished it before calling the fight to an early end.

Al Sands (now 20-2 with 18 kayos) defeats Mengistu Zarzar (now 6-1 with 5 kayos) by TKO in round 8 of 8 scheduled.

Round 1

Sands, substantially taller than Zarzar, comes out jabbing.  Zarzar opens up with a frantic attack of incredibly wide and wild hooks, and flails away until he loses his balance and falls down.  No knockdown is registered.  The fight resumes and Sands is punching from outside.  Sands comes forward and lands a single right to the body.  Zarzar’s counter is so wild that he spins halfway around.  Sands steps forward and thrwows a left that Zarzar ducks underneath.  Sands follows Zarzar into a corner and lands a one-two, then Zarzar torques himself into the center of the ring.  Sands is moving deliberately, Zarzar is out of control.  Sands throws, Zarzar latches on, and when Sands backs up Zarzar falls on his hands and knees.  No knockdown.

Round 2

Sands is moving forward from the start, jabbing.  Zarzar attacks furiously, but ineffectively with those wide hooks.  Sands follows Zarzar into a neutral corner and lands a jab, then a sharp left hook.  Zarzar is all anger and aggression.  Sands is coming forward, beginning to potshot his opponent.  Sands catches Zarzar bending forward and uppercuts him.  Zarzar lashes out and connects with a hard shot to the shoulder, and Sands raises his eyebrows.  Sands follows Zarzar into a corner (again) and lands a jab, then Zarzar grabs onto him and pushes him into the center of the ring.  Sands follows Zarzar ito a corner (again) and lands two punches of a flurry.  Zarzar is moving herky-jerky, like he’s exhausted.  Sands ducks a big left hook and the bell rings.

Round 3

Sands jabs forward and Zarzar explodes with aggression.  After a moment of clutching Zarzar throws a wild flurry full of attitude and anger.  There’s a clash of heads and Zarzar is cut in the corner of his right eye.  Sands is jabbing, jabbing, and finally follows with a right.  Both men throw left hands at the same time, and though Zarzar’s lands harder, Sands looks better.  Zarzar throws a left-right and both punches land.  Sands is cool and collected and continues to stalk.  Zarzar is trying to push his shorts down and Sands attacks, catching him by surprise.  Zarzar is gasping now, throwing one or two punches at a time instead of the extended flurries that characterized the early going.  Sands sharpshoots him and Zarzar clinches as the round comes to a close.

Round 5

Sands is following, Zarzar lunging for single punches now.  Sands is getting the better of it, being  more aggressive in the early part of round 5.  Zarzar backs into a corner for the umpteenth time and Sands pursues.  Zarzar looks absolutely exhausted, and Sands continues to follow, throwing more than he lands, but scoring occasionally.  Zarzar scores a single left, and the clock runs out on round 5.

Round 6

Zarzar comes out jabbing, but there’s nothing behind the jabs.  Sands continues to follow, using the formula that has worked so well thus far: follow Zarzar till he runs out of real estate, then connect with a one-two.  Sands lands a power shot to the body, then another to the  head, and Zarzar is wilting.  Zarzar is reeling, Sands picking his shots and beating him mercilessly.  Zarzar puts h is head down, with ten seconds to go comes back up and lands one wide left that lands flush and thrills the crowd.

Round 7

Referee Mark Nelson calls time and the doctor examines Zarzar’s bleeding eye.  The fight resumes and Sands comes forward – this time Zarzar doesn’t retreat but counters, and both men land.  There may also have been a clash of heads.  Sands continues to stalk, throwing one-twos, but he looks less fresh, and less balanced than he has looked.  Zarzar backs into the blue corner ropes and Sands catches up, throws a weak arm punch and then a stiff one-two that scores.  Zarzar lands a big single shot.  Sands comes forward and Zarzar catches him coming in, but Sands walks through it and scores another left-right.  Zarzar is bleeding from the nose.  Sands stumbles, but then keeps coming forward, landing more effective shots.  The bell rings and Zarzar sneers before returning to his corner.

Round 8

Zarzar comes right out, mauls Sands, and then lands a glancing left that sprays sweat into the air.  Sands is going downstairs-upstairs and though he looks tired and wobbly, and somewhat stiff-legged.  Sands chases again, Zarzar bends down, and Sands goes body-head, scoring with both.  Zarzar is throwing back, but Sands lands a big right that sends Zarzar stumbling backwards across the ring.  He rights himself in the ropes.  Zarzar is attacking, but his attack plays out and Sands catches him with a left to the temple.  Sands clobbers Zarzar and it looks like it’s all over, but somehow Zarzar keeps his feet even as Sands pummels him with more rising hooks.  Zarzar stumbles the entire width of the ring to his own corner, and referee Mark Nelson stops it.  Sands wins.

Ramiro Hernandez (now 9-0 with 7 kayos) defeats Nate Rubin (now 4-1 with 2 kayos) by Unanimous Decision (60-54, 59-55, 59-55) after 6 rounds.

Round 1

Hernandez opens the bout with some off-target jabs.  The fighters circle, and Hernandez lands a right to the ribs.  Rubin is inching forward, now inching back.  Hernandez scores again.  Rubin snaps a triple jab that connects.  Rubin is switching stances and moving.  Referee Miezwa warns Hernandez to keep his punches up, then pauses the action moments later to pull Rubin’s shorts up.  Now the fighters exchange in the center of the ring, neither man gaining an advantage.  Hernandez is trying to be fast and throw short punches, causing to short-arm several times.  Hernandez lands, and Rubin shakes his head dismissively.  Ten seconds to go, and Hernandez goes on attack, outlanding Rubin to close the round.

Round 2

Hernandez comes out aggressive, touching Rubin to the body and head.  Rubin comes forward but isn’t connecting.  There’s an exchange, and Rubin connects with a right hook.  Hernandez looks more polished.  Hernandez comes into range and Rubin connects with a good body shot.  Hernandez smiles as Rubin jabs him to the body.  Hernandez is moving in and out with alacrity, scoring with fast power shots.  Rubin jabs and Hernandez clinches.  Hernandez attacks and connects, but then Rubin holds his arm and throws a couple to the body.  Rubin connects with a left and a right to show he’s still in the fight, and round 2 ends.

Round 3

Both men are trying to out-quick their opponent.  Hernandez lands a left that rocks Rubin, but Rubin shows no concern and comes forward again.  Now they’re circling to the left, Hernandez inching forward.  More circling, Rubin keeping his hands low.  Hernandez with a left to the body.  Rubin connects to the head of Hernandez.  Hernandez is getting aggressive, and things are getting heated.  Rubin scores twice.  Hernandez snaps Rubin’s head back with a hard jab.  Rubin ducks and Hernandez scores with an uppercut.  The pace quickens with seconds to go in the round, but no significant punches are landed.

Round 4

Both men land jabs. Hernandez is punching from angles.  Rubin comes forward and scores with a left, then shoves Hernandez away.  Hernandez lands a jab, then misses with a crossing left.  Rubin is having trouble catching up with Hernandez’ speed.  Hernandez is having trouble landing clean punches. Hernandez comes forward, throws a flurry, and lands a right to the head of Rubin.  Rubin counters and lands the same. Hernandez attacks and scores with several power punches.  There’s a tactical lull, and Hernandez comes forward.  Rubin seems more comfortable inside, but he isn’t scoring enough to win when he gets there.  Round 4 ends with mauling and glancing blows from both men.

Round 5

Hernandez is being encouraged by his corner to come forward, and he endeavors to comply. Rubin lands a thudding right, but doesn’t follow it up and Hernandez seems unaffected.  Hernandez is coming forward and scoring.  Rubin ducks a punch but doesn’t counter – he has the elements to win, but isn’t putting them together.  Hernandez holds and hits but isn’t warned.  Hernandez attacks again and scores – not a lot, but more than Rubin.  Hernandez holds and hits again, and is warned this time by a scowling Gary Miezwa.

Round 6

Hernandez comes forward, misses a right, and retreats to the ropes.  Rubin scores with a single punch.  There’s an exchange, both fighters land, and Hernandez is warned again, this time for low punching.  Now Hernandez comes forward, Rubin retreats, and Hernandez chases.  Hernandez has trouble scoring as Rubin clutches and ducks.  Each man scores, but Hernandez outlands Rubin by 2-to-1.  Rubin lands a punch to the back of Hernandez’ head and is warned by ref Miezwa.  Rubin is looking for an opening, but he can’t fill it when he sees it.  Now Rubin scores a couple of times, then a third time…but Hernandez fights back with effective power shots.  The fighters are trading power shots for the last fifteen seconds or so of the final round, both men landing but neither man hurt.

Ve Shawn Owens (now 7-0 with 7 kayos) defeats Brandon Phillips Black (now 1-3) by TKO at 2:45 of round 2.

Round 1

Owens comes out with intent to end it early.  After some quick jabbing from both parties, Owens lands a one-two and then corners Black, trapping him in a corner and throwing a large number of punches in a very short time.  Black is hurt and on defense, and Owens gives chase, battering him all over the ring.  After a complete circuit of the ring Owens corners B Black again, but Black surprises by landing a single hard counter shot that causes Owens to pause for a moment.  But the pattern is set, and Owens spends the remainder of the bout chasing and throwing.  With about five seconds left in the round Black catches Owens again, but those are his only two good moments in the entire round.

Round 2

Black comes out standing up and jabbing.  Owens resumes stalking, and follows Black into the blue corner where he lands a number of big punches.  Black backs away again, eventually sneaking in two good counters.  Owens is shuffling forward, setting his feet, and throwing combinations – more leisurely now.  Owens catches Black on the ropes and lands three right hooks in a row.  Black looks alert though, and continues to look for opportunities to shoot back.  Owens looks in danger of punching himself out – can anyone sustain this pace?  Owens continues to attack, and referee Mark Nelson stops the bout at 2:45 of round 2.

Anthony Palmisano (now 2-0 with 2 kayos) defeats Ivey Nixon (now 1-2) by TKO at 1:58 in round 1 of 4 scheduled.

Round 1

The bout begins with aggressive work from both men.  Palmisano looks the stronger of the two, but Nixon looks slippery.  Palmisano is the aggressor, working with cool detachment and a serene face, Nixon looking to counter.  Mid-round Palmisano lands a single monster right that crumbles Nixon – Nixon collapses as if boneless.  A dazed Nixon  surprises everyone by rising to his feet, and though he’s wobbly, referee Gary Miezwa permits the fight to continue. The outcome is a forgone conclusion.  Palmisano pounds away at Nixon, who seems to need to fall but can’t, and finally Miezwa steps in and calls – it – Palmisano by TKO.

Delorean Caraway (now 10-1 with 5 kayos) defeats Gilbert Venegas (now 15-30-5 with 8 kayos) by Split Decision (54-56, 60-54, 59-55) in six rounds

Round 1

Caraway strikes first, landing a left-right-left to the body of Venegas.  After Caraway flurries a few times, Venegas responds with shots to the body.  Caraway is starting quicker tonight than the last time we saw him, intending to send a message.  Caraway is busy, throwing tons of power shots with impressive speed.  Venegas, however, is occasionally landing a big right hook to the head, when he can time Caraway.  This is an action round, and the fighters trade leather to the end.

Round 2

Caraway goes first again, landing a single jab, then throwing an extended combination.  Venegas is pursuing Caraway, but Caraway is alert and aggressive as he retreats.    Caraway is jab-jab-jabbing as he backs around the ring.  Venegas throws a few jabs, but he’s really looking for an opening for a big overhand right.  Caraway has a lightning fast jab, and he’s using it effectively.  Caraway goes to the body, and Venegas counters with a big single left to the head.  Another exchange, and Caraway is landing more frequently than Venegas.  Round 2 ends with ten seconds of tense inactivity.

Round 3

Caraway starts with three jabs, then three more.  NA single jab.  Caraway with a right-left to the body, then he looks to the head, and now he goes back downstairs.  Venegas is standing in there, shuffling forward, but unable to pull the trigger.  Venegas with a single jab.  Caraway throws a right and Venegas finally responds with three power shots.  Caraway scores again, then Venegas comes out of his shell and lands a nice combination to the head and body.  Venegas with a single right, but it’s a soft one.  Caway is backing up, leading Venegas all over the ring, pausing occasionally to sharpshoot him.  Venegas continues to come forward, but his punch output – though powerful – is low.  Venegas again lands a single soft right to the head, but follows with an effective flurry. Two hard jabs from Venegas cause Caraway to shake his head.

Round 4

Caraway starts the round with about ten fast, unanswered shots.  Caraway lands a glancing left that causes Venegas to wobble, only momentarily.  Venegas is stalking, but Caraway is leading with greater volume, power, and accuracy.  Finally Venegas throws a five punch combination that lands to the body of Caraway.  Caraway likes to throw that jab from a low position, and Venegas takes advantage, landing a hard right, but Caraway is wearing him down.  Venegas is tiring, but Caraway loks the same as he did in round one.  Venegas flurries to the body while Caraway simultaneously flurries to the head.  Caraway continues to lead Venegas on a chase, potshotting him as he retreats.

Round 5

Venegas throws the first punch of this round, but Caraway responds with a long, hard flurry.  Venegas is throwing single punches now.  Venegas lands, Carway counters and bounces backward.  Caraway misses with a series of jabs.  Venegas misses a right, and Caraway counters.  Caraway’s corner calls for more punches and Caraway obliges.  Referee Mark Nelson breaks ups a clinch.  Caraway lands a number of showy punches. Venegas backs hi into a neutral corner and connects with two or three hard body shots, but Caraway flutters away.  Venegas is coming forward, but he can’t catch Caraway.  Venegas lands one punch, Caraway counters with a single shot, and the bell rings.

Round 6

Venegas’ left eye is looking swollen.  Caraway starts the round with jabbing again, but Venegas stifles him.  Caraway throws a long combination, and finishes with a single head shot that freezes Venegas.  Venegas continues to come forward, and he can’t land.  Caraway looks the best I’ve ever seen him.  Caraway is talking to the crowd, then he ducks his head and clinches.  Venegas throws a one-one-two, but Caraway moves him with a hard counter.  Venegas comes forward, Caraway pummels him again.  Venegas doesn’t have the tools to catch up with Carraway’s speed and movement, but he’s dogged, and finally gets Caraway backed into a corner and lands a series of hard punches.  Caraway comes out of the exchange looking no worse, and goes back to work.  Ten seconds to go, and Venegas lands a single right, then both men trade punches to the bell.

Adrian Taylor (now 4-0 with 3 kayos) defeats Tristan James by UD (40-36, 40-36, 40-36) in four rounds.

Round 1

The first round begins with both men engaging in tactical exploration.   It doesn’t take long for the strength of Taylor to show, as he bulls, clinches, and pops James with impunity.    Taylor’s quick hands allow him to land straight punches that seem to shock and annoy James.  Mid-round the fighters get in close and James manages to get his hands under Taylor’s guard, and he throws a flurry of uppercuts, landing one in particular that makes Taylor flinch. The round ends as it began; Taylor scoring with more straight punches.

Round 2

James intends to come out jabbing, but Taylor gets inside in a hurry.  Taylor finds a target for his right hand on James’ face.  The bout is becoming less competitive, a Taylor is able to avoid James’ punches, which are quickly losing their steam.  Taylor lands a one-two to the body.  James responds by backing up with a sequence of ineffective jabs.  James clinches, and referee Gary Miezwa separates the combatants.  Taylor measures the distance with a stationary left hand, and James responds with a flurry that fails to impress.  Additional activity produces no action before the bell.

Round 3

James looks frustrated as the round begins.  Taylor jabs the head, then the body.  Taylor lands power shots to the body.  James is circling to his left, but Taylor’s crisper punching breaks his pattern and forces him to retreat again.  Taylor lands a hard jab, James responds with three punches that score.  James, the taller fighter, is trying to keep his distance, but Taylor is stalking him.  Taylor strikes James’’ ribs with a hard right that shudders James.  James comes forward throwing punches – Taylor’s corner shouts “I want pressure, don’t you dare go back!” and Taylor responds with a flurry of effective power shots.

Round 4

Taylor leads with a jab and then lands a huge straight right that impresses the crowd.  James dances around the ring, then comes forward with an aggressive rally.  Taylor lands a right-left-right that drives James backwards. Taylor is sharpshooting him now, scoring almost at wil.  James blocks a right and counters, but his punches are ineffective.  Taylor shuffles forward, measure the distance, and lands a short flurry that ends with another big right.  Now they’re mauling, and James puts his head down and bulls forward, pushing Taylor into the ropes in his own corner.  They return to the center of the ring and trade short power punches.  Taylor gets the better of the exchange, and they separate.  James is trying to score as the round comes to a close, Taylor counters sporadically and then ducks the remainder of James’ offensive output.

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Round-by-Round Report: August 28th, 2015 at Grand Casino Hinckley

Markus Morris (now 7-2 with 4 kayos) defeats Patrick Cape (now 6-12 with 3 kayos) by TKO at 1:54 of round one.

Round 1

The round begins with the fighters circling left.  Morris attacks first, catching Cape with an awkward punch, moving Cape’s head.  Cape escapes, no worse for wear, but Morris is the aggressor and resumes the attack.  Cape is is blocking Morris’s punches with his head in the early going.  Our fighters get into a phone booth and in a near-clinch Morris lands a solid left that drops Cape to his knees.  After the fight resumes there’s lots of rough stuff, with Morris landing lots of short hooks.  Cape is dropped again but beats the count, but looks a little disoriented in the neutral corner.  After another resumption, Morris attacks with purpose and Cape takes another short right, drops a third time.  Referee Mark Nelson stops the fight at 1:54 of round 1.

Raul Munoz (now 23-20 with 16 kayos) is defeated by Mohammad Kayongo  (now 18-4-1 with 13 kayos) by TKO at 2:14 of round 1

Round 1

Munoz starts out circling to Kayongo’s right.  Kayongo rotates to face his opponent.  Munoz throws several jabs to open the fight, but there’s no intent.  Munoz is moving, moving, moving.  Now Munoz steps forwar and lands one good left jab and moves out    Munoz is looking to score, but the next time he comes in Kayongo lands and chases him.    Munoz is moving, circling…he comes close again and Kayongo counters with a power shot.  ow the pattern is set, with Munoz stepping forward and Kayongo landing a wicked series of power punches.  Munoz looks wobbly for a moment, but collects himself and moves away.  One last time, the fighters close the gap, and Kayongo lands a killer combination of hooks to the body.  Munoz crumbles.  He’s grimacing as he rolls onto his back, and there’s no doubt it’s over.  Referee Gary Miezwa counts him out, and that’s a TKO win for the African Assassin.

Antwan Robertson (now 10-14-1 with 6 kayos) defeats  Philip Adyaka (now 4-6 with 2 kayos) by Unanimous decision after five rounds.  (48-47, 48-47,48-47)

Round 1

Adyaka leads things off with a snappy jab.  Both men feint, then both jab.  The fighters are measuring.  Robertson attacks like I haven’t seen him do in years, landing a one-two that scores nicely.  Robertson attacks again, but Adyaka counters.  Now Adyaka comes forward, landing a one-two.  Adyaka isses with a left hook and Robertson makes him pay with a double counter.  They tie up in the ropes, and breakk.  Adyaka is inching forward, leads with a triple jab, and scores.  Robertson is moving more, shuffling to his left.  Now Robertson retreats and gets into a corner.  Adyaka comes forward, but robertson runs.  They circle the ring, Adyaka finally attacking.  There’s an exchange that benefits neither man.  Ten seconds to go and Robertson tries to get busier, but Adyaka ties him up and lands several shots in the clinch.  The bell rings with Robertson trying to connect overhanded.

Round 2

Adyaka is coming forward in round two, the taller Robertson moving his feet to stay outside.  Now Robertson picks a spot and a clinch.    Robertson tries to touch and go, but gets caught by a left hook.  Adyaka comes forward, jabbing, and Robertson flurries then scoots.  Adyaka comes forward again and lands two of three power shots.  Robertson is staying outside, moving to hiss left.  Adyaka is looking for a big scores.  Robertson sticks and moves.  Adyaka steps in and lands a big left-right.    Adyaka steps forward and leads with a left hook that scores.  Adyaka is chasing, throws a double jab that bothers robertson.  Adyaka jabs and Robertson throws a counter that misses.  ten seconds to go, Robertson lands a hammering one-two.  There’s some shuffling, but no more offense before the sound.

Round 3

Adyaka is coming straight forward, leading with lunging jabs.  John Hoffman, in Robertson’s corner, keeps saying “He can’t tough you.”  But then Adyaka touches him with a serious one-two.  Robertson tries to swoop in, land, and move away.  Adyaka is getting closer, and there’s an occasional score, but …Adyaka finally gets inside and there’s a furious exchange.  Adyaka, bleeding from the mouth, rushes in and takes a big shot from Robertson.  His knees give, but he springs back up before hitting the deck.  Adyaka is infuriated, and comes forward again, throwing power shots.  Adyaka’s blood is on robertson’s shoulder and back.  Adyaka lunges forward, missing with wild power shots.  Robertson counters, landing a nice scoring shot.  Adyaka gets inside again, and Robertson ties him up.  They’re getting rough in there.  Miezwa tries to break them up, but Adyaka keeps throwing.  The bell rings.

Round 4

Adyaka comes looking for Robertson’s blood this round, and lands a number of power shots on Robertson’s guard.   Robertson is trying to keep him outside, but Adyaka’s aggression is hard to deny.  After a big flurry, Adyaka reins it in.  Adyaka tries to get inside, and Robertson lands a thunderous punch to the head that leaves Adyaka weak in the knees.  Adyaka is alert though, and resumes stalking Robertson.  now Robertson is glaring and flexing.  That kind of showboating can backfire.  Adyaka steps back and beckons Robertson, but Robertson isn’t biting.  Adyaka comes forward again, but Robertson stays away.  Robertson steps back one time to omany, gets his back into the ropes, and Adyaka catches him, but Adyaka can’t capitalize.  Ten seconds to go and Adyaka goes on the attack again, nearly ending up in a clinch, landing a left to the body at the bell.

Round 5

Ayaka knows he’s behind, and he’s looking for a big round.  Double jab, right hand from Adyaka.  Adyaka charges forward, Robertson has to leap out of the way and misses with a counter.  Tiny Adyaka, muscled like a bull, just can’t get inside on the lankier Robertson.  Adyaka comes forward with a triple jab but misses.  Adyaka charges forward again, landing several jabs to the body, but nothing showy.  Robertson seems content to run.  Adyaka traps Robertson against the ropes and lands two or three power shots to the body.  Coming forward again, Adyaka lands a big snapping right to the head.  Then again, and again.  Robertson retreats into a corner, Adyaka pursues and lands again.  This is Adyaka’s best round, as he has scored repeatedly on a shrinking Robertson.  The bell rings and both men turn away.  There is no evident love here.

The crowd boos the decision because they view this bout as a fight, instead of as a boxing match.  If it’s a fight, Adyaka wins.  Because boxing matches are scored like figure skating, Robertson wins.

George Carter Jr (now 12-0-1 with 6 kayos) defeats Ricky Smith (now 3-7) by Unanimous Decision (49-46, 49-46, 49-46)

Round 1

Smith and Carter meet immediately in the center of the ring, but they start out by pawing and feinting.  There’s a momentary pause, and Carter explodes with sudden power shots.  Smith is unfazed and scoots away.  Carter lands a power shot to the head, but Smith walks through it and clinches.  After the break, Carter attacks again with speed and power, but Smith is cagey and tough, refusing to be hurt.  Carter is forced to respect his opponent’s chin, if not his speed.  Smith dodges a left hook from Carter, and they clinch, then break.  Now there’s an exchange in which Smith actually lands a couple of punches, and for the first time this evening we’re going past the first round.  Bell.

Round 2

Smith looks more confident this round, poking the jab out and moving his head.  Carter is jabbing for measure.  There’s a break, then a clash that includes a bump of heads. Smith lands a right to the body before Miezwa breaks them up.  Carter is coming forward, looking for a big scoring punch, and bends Smith over with a punch to the midsection, but Smith doesn’t go down.  Smith is retrating and moving left, Carter is trying to put him away.  Smith’s corner tells him to “give him the business once in a while.”  Smith is holding his own this round.  He won’t hurt Carter, but he is scoring occasionally.  There’s another break, and Smith lands  ajab to the body.  Carter’s frustration is starting to show.  Smith dodges a punch and Carter growls in frustration.  Smith is showing some nifty moves, but one looks at that soft body and wonders how long he can keep it up.

Round 3

Carter is coming forward and loading up.  Smith is circling left.  Carter lands a flush shot to the head.  Smith responds with a glancing jab.  Carter’s speed and power are obvious, but his ring IQ is unfortunately not high.  Carter lands with a lead left that jolts Smith, but fails to follow up.  Smith is circling left again.  Carter misses with two jabs, but then lands two power punches.  Smith feints.  Carter throws a sweeping right that misses.  Smith throws a one-two that Carter ducks.  Carter is coming forward again, but Smith is proving hard to catch.  Now Smith comes forward with a triple jab, but nothing lands.  Carter with a left hook to the body.  Carter with a left jab to the head.  Smith is attacking ineffectually as the bell sounds.

Round 4

Carter is landing single shots to the body.  Now Carter flurries and lands a bomb.  The two meet in the center of the ring and trade, and the crowd cheers.   Carter continues to pursue and occasionally score.  Smith with a power punch to the head, there’s a rarity.  Carter comes forward and throws three punches, but Smith blocks.  Carter throws, Smith ducks, and Carter lands an overhand right.  There’s a close encounter and Carter is warned to keep his punches up.  Carter continues to press the action, and finally is rewarded when he lands, then lands again.    Smith jabs.  Carter steps into a left hook.  After a break, Carter attacks and lands big.  He follows Smith and lands several hurtful shots.  Smith, surprisingly, gets angry and trades with him.  Now the crowd is roaring!  Carter has his back to the ropes as the round ends, but seems unhurt.

Round 5

Carter is loading up, Smith pawing in the early going.  Carter steps forward and stabs a jab into Smith’s body, but Smith dances away, pounding his chest and belly.  The crowd likes the showmanship.  Smith leads with a left hook that misses and Carter reaches outside to land a right hook to the body.  Carter pushes Smith into the ropes, and Gary Miezwa breaks them up.  Carter is chasing, and lands a downhill right that leaves Smith wobbling.  The chase is on!  Carter is walking forward and throwing power shots, Smith is retreating, looking hurt.  Carter lands a big hook!  Smith, retreating, throws a straight right that lands flush.  Smith is an unlikely looking fighter, but he seems to hold up okay.  Ten seconds to go, Carter is lo0king to put Smith away, but Smith ties him up, then flurries with him as time expires.

Smith never had a chance in this physical mismatch, but he seems pleased to have frustrated his younger, fitter opponent, and the crowd is amused.

Cerresso Fort (now 18-4-1 with 12 kayos is defeated by Romon Barber (now 5-9 with 4 kayos) ; referee stops fight before the start of the sixth round

Round 1

The fight begins with tactical sparring, a lot of jabbing.  Barber is a tough guy, a gamer.  Fort hasn’t looked great the last few times out.  About midway through the round Fort steps into a jab that knocks Barber off balance, but when Fort pursues, Barber counters effectively and scores.  Barber is coming forward, but Fort is taller and stymies him for a moment.  When Barber gets inside, Fort ties him up.  Barber is getting more aggressive as the fight progresses, but Fort makes him pay.  There’s a near clinch, but they wrestle out of it, and the round ends.

Round 2

Barber comes right out to start the round, and though Fort at first proves hard to hit, Barber keeps charging in, and there’s a series of power shots, a tangle, and Fort goes down in the ropes.  Referee Mark Nelson pauses the bout to have a brief word with the combatants, and the fight resumes.  Fort is trying to stay ouside and  box.  Barber is trying to make it a war, coming forward and ducking.  Barber finally gets close and Fort ties him up.  After the break, Barber lunges forward and misses with a straight left.  fort’s footwork  and balance seem off.  Barber gets inside, throws a punch as he steps back, and rocks fort.  All of Fort’s movements seem compromised, from his exaggerated upper body movement to his clumsy feet.  Just before the round ends, Barber throws out a lead that Fort counters.

Round 3

Barber is eager to begin.  he comes forward and ducks a couple of sweeping lefts from Fort.  Fort jabs tentatively – that would have scored nicely if he’d put more behind it.  Barber is energetic, on his toes, coming forward.  Fort is jabbing and moving backwards.  Barber’s eagerness puts him in awkward positions, but Fort doesn’t take advantage.  Now they’re jabbing, with neither man taking the initiative.  Barber comes forward again, but Fort wards him off with a slow jab.  Fort is coming forward now, throwing wreckingball rights.  Barber ducks a bunch of them, but some connect, and the audience is impressed.  Barber comes forward again, but runs out of time in the third.

Round 4

Fort is jabbing to start the round, but Barber gets close enough to turn Fort’s head with a right.  Barber is coming forward again, and lands a big lunging left hook that staggers fort.  Barber has the definite advantage at this moment.  Barber continues to hunt his opponent.  Fort ties Barber up and walks forward, pushing the smaller Barber backwards and into the ropes.  this fight is devolving into a wrestling match.  Back in the center of the ring, Barber is dancing.  The fighters trade, and fort scores.  Barber hurts Fort with a power shot, chases him, and does it again!    Barber pursues Fort to the blue corner and lands a huge left that leaves Fort wavering, but the bell rings.  Fort does not look good.

Round 5

At the starting bell, Fort is called to a neutral corner to be inspected by the doctor.  The doctor nods at Mark Nelson, and the fight resumes.  Barber goes back on the attack, but Fort nullifies it momentarily.  There’s a clinch, and another break.  Fort is retreating, Barber coming forward.  Barber knows what’s been working, and he’s reluctant to take a backward step.  Barber steps into a counter left from Fort, a small victory for Fort in a fight that isn’t going well.  Barber comes forward again and eats a jab from Fort, but he again comes forward.  Barber steps forward and swallows a jab – Is Fort coming out of his stupor?  Barber continues to come forward, but he’s missing with those power shots this round.  Ten seconds to go, and Fort throws a big right, Barber ducks under it, and Fort nearly topples over.  This observer is concerned for Cerresso Fort’s health.

There’s some confusion in the ring.  Has the fight been stopped?  Yes, on the doctor’s advice referee Mark Nelson has stopped this bout.  Romon Barber wins.

Robert Brant (now 17-0 with 11 kayos) defeats Lekan Byfield (now 6-11-2 with 1 kayo) by TKO at 2:19 in round 3 of 8 rounds scheduled.

Round 1

Brant comes out immediately shooting a serious jab that connects.  Byfield, not to be intimidated, throws back.  Brant is staying in close, looking to put on a show.  Byfield steps forward with a one-two.  Brant responds in kind, flurrying as he comes forward.  Brant has a major league jab, and he is using it – a lot.  Brant pursues Byfield to the ropes, landing a left-right-right.  Byfield waggles his tongue as he retreats.  Brant doesn’t want to be shown up, so he turns on the juice, battering Byfield, but Byfield is a serious fighter.  Brant is taking some chances now, trying to trap and pummel his belligerent opponent.  Brant lands a series of power shots, punctuating the attack with a reaching left hook on a retreating Byfield.  byfield loses his mouthguard.  Action resumes for a few seconds before the bell, Brant scoring with hard shots.

Round 2

Brant comes forward, looking to score, and Byfield lands a left-right, two very good punches. Brant shakes it off and resumes thattack.  There’s a roving exchange, and Brant gets the better of it, sending Byfield reeling.  Byfield lands an uppercut.  Brant comes forward, leaves himself unguarded, and Byfield scores.  Brant fires a fusillade of hot power shots, and Byfield is hurt.  Brant chases Byfield into the blue corner and rocks him with a series of fast and hard punches from both hands.  Byfield escapes momentarily, but Brant clobbers him with a right.  Byfield barely kept his feet after that.  Brant is coming forward.  Byfield jabs to the body, then throws some arm-swinging punches that have no effect.  Brant continues to attack, and though Byfield blocks some punches, he absorbs more.

Round 3

Byfield comes out swinging.  He’s regained his swagger.  He’s better stop sticking his tongue out, or it’ll get mailed home.  Byfield lands several power shots on Brant – Brant comes forward.  Brant steps forward and eats a big right hand that buckles his knees, but his eyes are impassive and he regains his footing.  Byfield is fighting in close, and Brant wants to sharpshoot him.  Brant steps in again, but he’s stopped short by a series of punches from different angles.  Brant steps through the counters, batters Byfield from angry angles, and drops him with a big left to the head.  Byfield is up before the count, but he’s wobbly.  Brant jumps on him, cracks him like an egg, and Byfield stumbles across the ring while referee Gary Miezwa chases him, trying to catch him while waving off the fight.  It’s over, TKO for Brant.

Al Sands (now 15-2 with 13 kayos) is defeated by Phil “The Drill” Williams (now 15-7 with 14 kayos) at 2:36 in round 1 of ten rounds scheduled.  Williams becomes the new Minnesota State Cruiserweight Champion.

Round 1

Sands throws first tonight, jab, jab, jab, double jab.  Nothing connects.  Williams ducks and jabs, and lands to the body.  Everything is jabs to start with, then Sands finally follows a jab with a straight right.  Williams stabs his foot forward and jabs to the body.  For the first time Williams turns his hips and throws a right, but it grazes Sands’ body.  Williams gets inside and throws a combination, but Sands counters and scores.  Williams sticks a hard jab to Sands’ midsection.  Williams steps and throws a left hook that lands on Sands neck and shoulder and staggers Sands.  He hesitates just a moment, then jumps on Sands.  Williams pounds Sands without mercy, beating him from pillar to post, and Sands staggers toward the ropes and then collapses.  Sands is up quickly, but has to hold on to a rope to stop from falling over, and referee Mark Nelson calls it!  TKO win for Williams, and Minnesota has a new cruiserweight champion.

Midwest Boxing Outlook: Mid-Winter 2010

Here are some things that I know that I know…

  • Of interest to those who saw Edwin Rodriguez and Aaron Pryor Jr win their fights with James McGirt Jr and Dyah Davis at Fargo’s Scheels Arena on November 13th: Rodriguez and Pryor face each other in a super middleweight bout tonight on ESPN.    Though Pryor (15-2 with 11 kayos) has a pronounced advantage in height and reach, those seem to be his only advantages over Rodriguez (17-0 with 13 kayos), a hot prospect approaching contender status, who will be widely favored.  The Friday Night Fights broadcast will originate from beautiful Key West, Florida.  Peter Manfredo -vs- Daniel Edouard tops the bill and the broadcast.
  • Joey Abell, who faces Chris “The Nightmare” Arreola in California on January 28th, will be accompanied on the road by fellow ACR Gym denizen Jon Schmidt (10-1 with 6 kayos).  Schmidt is slated to face former Olympian Shawn Estrada (10-1 with 9 kayos) of East Los Angeles in a six-rounder.
  • Seconds Out Promotions brings us an IBF light heavyweight title eliminator on February 4th.  The fight will feature Otis Griffin and Yusuf Mack.  At this time the Fistic Mystic has no information on the undercard.
    Emily Klinefelter (9-0 with 3 KOs)

    Emily Klinefelter (9-0 with 3 KOs)

  • On February 5th in Iowa City, Adam Pollack of Win by KO Promotions will present a mixed show with amateur Muay Thai (4-5 bouts) and professional boxing (6-8 bouts) at the Johnson County fairgrounds.  The show will be headlined, as usual, by one of the Klinefelter girls.  The one sure thing on the card so far is the main event, which will pit super bantamweight Emily Klinefelter (9-0 with 3 kayos) against Christina Ruiz (5-3 with 3 kayos).  Tickets are available at Sushi Kicchin at the Old Capital Mall or by calling Win by KO Promotions at 319-338-1633.  The fairgrounds is located at 4261 Oak Crest Hill Road in scenic Iowa City.
  • Hortons Boxing presents a once-postponed show in Duluth on February 12th.  It can be confirmed that the following fights have been inked: RJ Laase -vs- Hector Orozco (rematch), Al Sands -vs- Zach Ziegler, and Aaron Green -vs- Jordan Ziegler.  Gary Eyer hasn’t been matched yet but is still expected to appear on the card.
  • Philip Adyaka is now managed by Scott Tolzmann.  It was originally believed that Adyaka would fight Gary Eyer in Duluth on February 12th, but Adyaka is now penciled in opposite Jonathan Perez for the 26th of February at Grand Casino Hinckley.  As of Thursday night the Hinckley show was reportedly 99% confirmed.  The headlining bout there is the much-anticipated rematch of Caleb Truax-Phil Williams, which ended in a surprising Split Draw back in April of 2010.  In that fight Truax had swept the early rounds but Williams took that last couple of rounds with effective power punching – it looked like a decisive points win for Truax until the scores were read, but in the end it’s the scorecards that do the deciding.  Supporting that bout is an interesting mix of fighters from Seconds Out Promotions and Midwest Sports Council (MSC).  Could this signal an era of greater cooperation between the two promotions?  That’s an eventuality that this writer has persistently hoped for, and in print.

Horton’s January 8th Show in Duluth Rescheduled to February 12th

Late word out of Duluth is that due to an unspecified injury to an unidentified main-event fighter, Horton’s Boxing has rescheduled their January 8th event to February 12th.  The venue remains the same – Clyde Iron Works Restaurant and bar in Duluth.

A source with knowledge of the situation says that the lineup us expected to include RJ Laase, Gary Eyer, Al Sands, Aaron Green, and the long-awaited professional debut of Dustin Mason.

Minnesota Boxing Results for October 28th & 29th

Results are taken from Boxrec, Minnesotaboxing.com, and other reports.

Friday October 29th in Winnipeg:

Willshaun Boxley (now 6-7 with 4 kayo) defeated Josh Dahl (now 2-3 with no kayos) by TKO in round 5 of unknown scheduled rounds.

Antwan Robertson (now 6-4 with 4 kayos) was defeated by Nestor Bolum (now 9-0 with 1 kayo) by UD after 4 rounds*

* This fight was reportedly going to be an exhibition, however the result here is reported by at least two sources.  I’m trying to verify that it was in fact a legitimate prizefight and that the result is official.

Thursday October 28th in Duluth:

RJ Laase (now 5-1 with 3 kayos) defeated Andrew Selwig (now 0-1) by TKO in round 2 of 4 rounds scheduled.

Al Sands (now 1-0 with 1 kayo) defeated Dustin Block (now 0-1) by TKO in round 1 of 4 rounds scheduled.

Aaron Green (now 1-0 with 1 kayo) defeated Will Gillette (now 0-2) by KO in round 1 of 4 rounds scheduled

Tim Farmer (now 1-0 with 1 kayo) defeated Adam Rocka (now 0-1) by TKO in round 2 of 4 rounds scheduled

Things Are Looking Up.

After a long period in the dumps, the Upper Midwest boxing scene finally seems to be bouncing back.

  • Troy Lowry travels to Indiana for an October 2nd matchup with prospect Andy Lee.  Lowry is expected to serve as a trial horse for the 23-1 Irishman.
  • October 9th at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Minneapolis, Seconds Out Promotions presents an interesting little show.  Headlining this card is Caleb Truax testing himself against faded but still-tough Jonathan Reid of Contender fame.  Supporting bouts are said to include Ismail Muwendo, Jon Schmidt, Jon Schmidt, Jeremy McLaurin, Charles Meier, and Antwan Robertson against Miami-based Ugandan Phillip Adyaka.
  • October 28th is the date for the next Horton’s show in Duluth.  Though a couple of hot Minneapolis-based prospects have been pulled from the card, it still retains three pleasing puglists in Gary Eyer, RJ Laase, and the pro-debuting Al Sands.  The quality of the show will depend, as always, on the quality of the matchmaking.  The matchmaking is the question right now.
  • Jesse Kelley of Minnesotaboxing.com reports that Darby Smart (11-4 with 4 kayo) will face one-beaten prospect Tyson Cave November 6th in a ten-rounder in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • The night of November 13th may bring us a quality boxing show at Grand Casino Hinckley, depending on factors that few of us understand or even know about.  The powers that be in Hinckley, which recently has been ground zero for Minnesota boxing, will soon announce their intentions, one way or the other.
  • One the same date in Iowa City IA a boxing card featuring Emily Klinefelter and Liliana Martinez is scheduled to take place.  I’ll bring you more details as they become available, but for now only the main event is set.
  • Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last week or so, you know that St Paul’s Jason Litzau (27-2 with 21 kayos) is slated to fight Celestino Caballero in Las Vegas on November 27th.   Caballero, the WBA super bantamweight world champ, carries the burden of a 34-2 record (23 kayos) and the stigma of a man who no one wants to fight.  No one, that is, except Jason Litzau.  This event will be triple-headlined by Caballero-Litzau, Juan Manuel Marez -vs- Michael Katsidis, and Andre Berto -vs- Freddy Hernandez.  Though none of these bouts rise to the first magnitude of boxing matchups, all three pairings are compelling and together they ought to make for a rousing fight card.

The Fistic Mystic says: There’s all this coming up and more. Yes, there are some things that I know but I can’t say because (shhh!) they’re secrets. Just know that the people who will bring you all this want to bring you more besides.

Announcing: Professional Boxing in Duluth on October 28th

Professional boxing returns to Duluth on October 28th with a ton of fights featuring an abundance of prospects.

It’s still too early to judge, but the preliminary fight card looks promising:

  • Gary Eyer (8-0-1 with 6 kayos) -vs- TBA (Main Event)
  • Javontae Starks (4-0 with 4 kayos) -vs- Hector Orozco (3-6 with no kayos)
  • RJ Laase (4-1 with 2 kayos)-vs- David Laque (2-5 with 2 kayos)
  • Al Sands (debut) -vs- TBA
  • Jamal James (1-0 with 1 kayo) -vs- TBA
  • Donnie Tierney (3-1 with 1 kayo) -vs- TBA
  • Tony Lee (1-0 with no kayos) -vs- TBA
  • Derek Winston (2-0 with no kayos) -vs- TBA

Highlights: Fight fans in the Twin Ports get their first look at Twin Cities prospects Winston, Lee, and James…heavyweight Al Sands makes his pro debut after an amateur career that culminated in an Upper Midwest Golden Gloves title and a trip to Nationals…RJ Laase makes his long-awaited return to the ring following a loss to the O-bandit Hector Orozco in May of 2009…Javontae Starks lays his unbeaten status on the line against the dangerous and tough Orozco, and always-exciting and heavy-handed counter puncher Gary Eyer headlines a fight card for the first time.

There’s been some uncertainty about the date of this event; it seems that there was a scheduling snafu at the venue (Grandma’s Sports Garden) which resulted in the wrong date being reserved with the state commission.  That’s all cleared up now, and the date of the 28th is said to be solid.

What: Professional boxing

Where: Grandma’s Sports Garden in Duluth

When: The evening of Thursday, October 28th

How: Presented by promoter Chuck Horton of Horton’s Gym, with matchmaking by Cory Rapacz (on loan from Midwest Sports Council)